Dementia Is Rooted in Insulin Brain Toxicity

Majid Ali, M.D.

All Known risk factors of dementia are first known risk factors of hyperinsulinism (insulin toxicity and then of Dementia.


Dementia Is rooted in insulin toxicity. I support my view by showing here that all known risk factors of dementia are rooted in insulin toxicity excess – hyperinsulinism, by another name.


 

Insulin Toxicity Can Be Reliably Detected Only by Blood Insulin Tests

The only direct and reliable method of detecting insulin toxicity is timed measurements of blood insulin concentrations after a glucose challenge. Employing this insulin test, in 2017, my colleagues and I documented a prevalence rate of hyperinsulinism of 75.1% in the general population in New York metropolitan area.1 This was not surprising since four years earlier the Chinese, employing blood glucose tests had reported a combined prevalence rate of prediabetes and diabetes of 50.1%.2

The core message of this short article, I state at the beginning, is: find out if you are insulin-toxic with blood insulin tests, and if this be the case, and you and on the path to dementia, clear insulin toxicity. For this purpose, I suggest my 3D Insulin Protocol comprising diet, detox, and dysox plans, and are presented in detail at www.alidiabetes.org.

 

Dementia Is rooted in insulin excess – hyperinsulinism, in the medical jargon is the term for it – which precedes Type 2 diabetes (T2D) by five, ten, or more years. This, succinctly stated, is the basic relationship between dementia, diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism.

 

As for the cause of dementia, my assertion that insulin toxicity is the root cause of dementia was one of the prediction of both oxygen model of hyperinsulinism and the oxygen model of dementia. I put forth these models in 19951 as extensions of my oxygen model of aging proposed in 19802. These models were based on my studies of mitochondrial dysfunction and respiratory-to-fermentative shift in chronic immune-inflammatory and other disorders proposed on 1980.

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