Is Diabetes A Sugar Problem? No.

Majid Ali, M.D.

Suite 3 C, 344 Prospect Avenue

Hackensack, New Jersey 07601

201-966-0027


 

Is diabetes mellitus (Type 2 Diabetes) a sugar problem? No. The abnormalities of blood sugar seen in diabetes are the consequences of the derangements of cellular energetics and toxicity that collectively create what is commonly called diabetes. Is diabetes an insulin problem? No. The abnormalities of insulin functions are the consequences of plasticized (chemicalized) and hardened cell membranes that immobilize the insulin receptors embedded in them. Is diabetes a problem of blood vessels that causes blindness, kidney failure, stroke, heart attacks, and neuropathy? No. The abnormalities of blood vessels are the consequences of oxidizing and deoxygenizing influences in diabetes.

In this column, I marshal evidence for my view that the state of insulin resistance should be regarded as a “hardened cell membrane state.” The so-called metabolic syndrome should be visualized as a “gummed-up matrix state.” Prediabetes should be seen as a “mitochondrial dysfunction state.” The strategies for the prevention and reversal of diabetes yield better long-term clinical results if diabetes is recognized as a “dysfunction oxygen signaling,” or dysox, state.

In type 1 diabetes, insulin itself becomes a potent autoantigen and initiates autoimmune injury to pancreatic islet cells.1-3 I will show how this recently documented role of insulin in the pathogenesis of diabetes fits in the dysox model of diabetes presented here. In type 2 diabetes, insulin cannot function – insulin resistance, in the common jargon – and hyperinsulinemia develops, which triggers and amplifies the inflammatory response.4-6 In all types of diabetes, the endothelial cells produce nitric oxide and other bioactive factors in abnormal quantities and proportions.7,8 Diabetes causes neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, dementia, stroke, and heart attacks. I will describe how those complications of diabetes can be better understood when the problems are seen through the prism of oxygen signaling.


 

Clinical, Epidemiologic, and Experimental Evidence Links Obesity With Insulin Toxicity

The link is supported by known metabolic roles of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and altered paracrine and endocrine functions of fat cells (adipocytes) in the energy economy of the body. For example, in a healthy state, NEFAs serve as substrates for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation. In obesity, these fatty acids are retained in excess in biomembranes of all cell populations of the body and within adipocytes. NEFAs, along with trans fats and oxidized lipids, then “harden” the cell membranes to clamp down on insulin receptors – rusting and impacting the crank, so to speak – to cause insulin resistance.12 Those lipids also “gum up” the matrix, blocking molecular cross-talk there. Eventually, those elements, along with other toxins, uncouple respiration from oxidative phosphorylation and impede mitochondrial electron transfer events.


 

In obesity, output of fattening hormones in adipocytes (fat cells) is chaotic in the ways in which it further increases cellular fat build-up and sets the stage for the development of diabetes.13,14 However, the obesity/diabetes link does not prevail in all populations of the world. For instance, in India, there is also an epidemic of low body-weight (LBW) diabetes15 – a phenomenon that clearly points to the existence of environmental factors unrelated to obesity that are involved in the pathogenicity of diabetes, and supports the dysox model of diabetes.

A growing number of free radicals, transcription factors, enzymes, and proteins has been – and continues to be – implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, including:
· nitric oxide16,17
· inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)18
· mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs)19-21
· proinflammatory cytokines22-24
· resistin25,26
· leptin27,28
· adipokines29
· adiponectin30
· tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a)31
· peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma)32-34
· nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1)35
· suppression of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins36
· retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4)37
· antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase38
· prothrombotic species, including fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), adipsin (complement D), and acylation-stimulating protein (ASP) 39-42
· heat shock protein 60, voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC-1), and Grp7543
· hypercoagulable platelets44


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